Top Azure Admin Interview Questions (2023) | CodeUsingJava
















Most frequently asked Azure Administrator Interview Questions


  1. What experience do you have with Azure services?
  2. What challenges have you faced in Azure administration and how did you address them?
  3. How have you optimized and monitored Azure services for cost effectiveness?
  4. Do you have experience in designing, developing and deploying Azure security policies?
  5. What experience do you have with DevOps tools such as Jenkins, Chef, or Puppet?
  6. What are your thoughts on automating the administration of Azure resources?
  7. How do you manage long-term storage requirements for customer data?
  8. How do you troubleshoot performance issues in Azure applications?
  9. What measures have you taken to ensure scalability and availability of Azure applications?
  10. How do you go about managing customer accounts and billing systems in Azure?
  11. What strategies do you use to keep up with changes in the Azure platform?
  12. How do you ensure high quality standards in Azure deployments?


What experience do you have with Azure services?

I have been working with Azure services for the past two years. I have experience in deploying and managing various Azure services including Azure Virtual Machines, Storage Accounts, Networking, App Service, AI & Machine Learning, DevOps and more. I have also worked on setting up monitoring and alerting services to keep track of resource utilization and operational metrics. Additionally, I have experience in configuring access control policies, identity management, and security protocols to ensure that resources hosted on Azure are secure and accessible only to authorized users. Furthermore, I have effectively used other features of Azure like PowerShell, Azure Automation, Logic Apps, and Serverless computing to automate processes and tasks. Over the past few months, I have also picked up additional technologies such as Azure DevOps, Kubernetes and Container services, which I see as central components of any cloud-based application architecture.

What challenges have you faced in Azure administration and how did you address them?

One of the most common challenges I have faced while administering Azure services is managing costs. With so many different services available, it is important to be able to properly track and optimize resource utilization in order to minimize overall costs. To address this, I have identified areas of inefficiency and created customized solutions to automate the monitoring and reporting of resource utilization. Additionally, I have deployed policies and scripts to ensure that idle resources are automatically shutdown or scaled down when not required.
Another challenge I have encountered is troubleshooting unexpected performance issues. This often involves identifying the root cause of an issue by analyzing metrics such as CPU utilization, memory usage, network traffic, etc. To accomplish this, I have developed a monitoring system which collects real-time data from the various resources and logs any exceptions which can then be used to identify and address performance issues.

How have you optimized and monitored Azure services for cost effectiveness?

To optimize Azure services for cost efficiency, I have put in place a number of measures and practices. Firstly, I maintain an inventory of all the resources used, allowing me to track any changes and identify areas of inefficiency. Secondly, I set up regular scheduled reports which allow me to monitor resource utilization and costs. This helps me to identify resources that are being underutilized or over-provisioned. Additionally, I use PowerShell scripts and Azure Automation to automate scale-in/scale-out based on utilization patterns and pricing rules.
I also deploy automated alerting and notification systems to help monitor the performance of resources and ensure that any excessive charges are minimized. As an example, I have utilized Azure Monitor to provide detailed insights into resource utilization and send out notifications when certain threshold values are exceeded. This is done using the following code snippet:
#Create Log Analytics workspace
$workspaceName = "MyLogAnalyticsWorkspace"
New-AzOperationalInsightsWorkspace -ResourceGroupName $resourceGroupName -Location $location -Name $workspaceName

#Enable monitoring for resource groups
$targetResourceGroups = "target-resource-group", "another-target-resource-group"
Set-AzDiagnosticSetting -ResourceId (Get-AzResource -ResourceGroupName $resourceGroupName).ResourceID -WorkspaceId (Get-AzOperationalInsightsWorkspace -Name $workspaceName).ResourceId -Enabled $true -Categories "Metrics" -Logs @{
    enabled=$true;
    aggregations="Average";
    RetentionInDays="60";
    TimeGrains="PT1H";
    included[0]=@{
        resourceGroupName="$($targetResourceGroups)"
        };
    }


Do you have experience in designing, developing and deploying Azure security policies?

Yes, I have experience designing, developing and deploying Azure security policies. For example, I have worked on designing policy plans that involve role-based access control (RBAC) to manage administrative permissions based on each user's required level of access. Additionally, I have also developed code snippets to help secure resources stored in Azure Storage and automate the process of applying security updates to deployed virtual machines and web applications. Furthermore, I have experience with deploying security best practices and architectures, such as cloud security networks, to help secure data, applications, and virtual machines that are hosted in Azure.

What experience do you have with DevOps tools such as Jenkins, Chef, or Puppet?

Yes, I have experience working with DevOps tools such as Jenkins, Chef, and Puppet. For example, I have experience integrating Jenkins CI/CD pipelines into an Azure environment, to provide automated deployments of applications and services. Additionally, I have experience working with Chef cookbooks, which are written in the Ruby language, to script the installation and configuration of various components of Azure deployments. I also have experience working with Puppet to automate the process of provisioning and deploying infrastructure into Azure, including virtual machines and web applications. Lastly, I have the ability to write and execute code snippets to help manage and monitor resources that are hosted in Azure.

How do you manage long-term storage requirements for customer data?

Long-term storage requirements for customer data can be managed in Azure using a combination of backup, archiving, and replication. Backups should be performed regularly to ensure customer data is protected from accidental deletion or modification. Azure Backup provides an automated service for creating cloud-based backups that are stored encrypted in an online vault. Administrators can also use Azure Site Recovery to replicate protected customer data to ensure that it is available in the event of a disaster.
Archiving customer data is also important to ensure that data is easily accessible without taking up too much space. Azure Storage Accounts support several forms of archiving, including the popular hierarchical storage manager (HSM). This archiving process stores infrequently used customer data on less expensive storage tiers, helping to reduce costs over time.
Lastly, administrators can take advantage of data replication to ensure customer data is always available and secure. Azure offers various services such as geo-replication, zone-redundant storage (ZRS), read access geo-redundant storage (RA-GRS), and geo-zone-redundant storage (RAZRS) which can be used to protect customer data from regional or network outages.
For even greater control, administrators can leverage PowerShell cmdlets such as Start-AzureRmBackup or Stop-AzureRmBackup to automate the backup process. Cmdlets such as Start-AzureRmArchiveBlob and Stop-AzureRmArchiveBlob can be used to automate archiving, while cmdlets like Start-AzureRmReplication and Stop-AzureRmReplication can help automate data replication processes.
By leveraging these features, Azure administrators can ensure that customer data is always available, secure, and cost-effective.


What are your thoughts on automating the administration of Azure resources?

Automating the administration of Azure resources is an efficient and cost-effective way to manage large-scale cloud deployments. By automating the administrative tasks, administrators can quickly provision new services, manage existing services, and scale resources as needed on demand. Automation also reduces the amount of manual labor and human error, enabling administrators to focus on more important tasks.
By leveraging Azure PowerShell, administrators can quickly write scripts to ensure that resources are properly provisioned and managed. PowerShell scripts can automate the deployment, configuration, and management of Azure resources, making it easy to deploy large-scale applications with minimal effort. Additionally, PowerShell cmdlets can be used to query and analyze resource usage, enabling administrators to identify potential resource issues before they become costly problems. Automation scripts can also be used to create compliance reports that help adhere to regulatory requirements.
For more complex automation scenarios, Azure Automation Service supports runbooks - graphical or PowerShell scripts - which can be used to perform scheduled operations or respond to changes in conditions. The Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template allows administrators to define the parameters and resources for an application deployment. ARM templates can be used to deploy entire environments including virtual machines, storage, network, and other resources in a predictable and repeatable manner.
By leveraging automation tools, Azure administrators can make sure their cloud environment is up to date and secure, while also preventing expensive downtime and costly human resources. Automation frees up the administrator's time to focus on more complex tasks, while helping to ensure that the cloud environment remains secure, stable, and cost-effective.

How do you troubleshoot performance issues in Azure applications?

Troubleshooting performance issues in Azure applications is a complex process that requires an understanding of network performance, application architecture and Azure services. Here are some tips to help troubleshoot performance issues in Azure applications:
  • 1. Gather and analyze performance metrics: Before diving into troubleshooting, the first step is to gather performance metrics from the application, such as response time, throughput, memory utilization, CPU utilization, disk utilization, etc. These metrics give an indication of where the performance bottleneck may be located.
  • 2. Inspect the application architecture: Once the performance metrics have been collected, it's important to inspect the application architecture to identify any potential bottlenecks or misconfigurations. This includes examining the storage configuration, network configuration, application components, and scaling options.
  • 3. Identify resource constraints: After inspecting the application architecture, it's important to assess whether the resources are sufficiently provisioned to meet the application's performance requirements. For example, if a virtual machine is provisioned with 1GB of RAM, but the application needs 2GB of RAM to perform optimally, then it's necessary to increase the RAM allocation.
  • 4. Leverage advanced analytics: To ensure optimal performance, Azure provides a suite of advanced analytics tools to help identify and address performance issues. These include Application Insights, which enables administrators to identify potential causes for performance issues and optimize the application's performance.
By following these steps, administrators can quickly identify and resolve performance issues within their Azure applications. Additionally, leveraging the advanced analytics tools provided by Azure can help administrators proactively identify and prevent potential performance issues before they become costly issues.


What measures have you taken to ensure scalability and availability of Azure applications?

Ensuring scalability and availability of Azure applications involves planning for the future and ensuring that resources are adequately sized to meet the application's needs. Here are some tips to help ensure scalability and availability of Azure applications:
  • 1. Leverage elastic scalability: Elastic scalability is a feature of Azure that allows administrators to quickly and seamlessly scale their applications up and down on demand, thereby reducing costs while providing the required performance. For example, administrators can use the Azure Autoscaling feature to automatically scale an application based on CPU utilization, memory utilization, or other metrics.
  • 2. Use Azure Traffic Manager: Azure Traffic Manager allows administrators to distribute traffic across multiple instances of an application, thereby ensuring reliability and availability. By configuring Traffic Manager, administrators can configure different routing rules depending on the application's requirements and can quickly and easily switch between primary and backup instances in the event of an outage.
  • 3. Employ redundancy: Redundancy is the practice of keeping redundant components in your application architecture to ensure availability in the event of a failure. For example, setting up multiple instances of a web application in different regions can allow administrators to quickly failover to a working instance in the event of a regional outage. Additionally, leveraging redundant storage solutions such as Azure Storage Replication can also provide additional protection against data loss in the event of an outage or disaster.
By leveraging elastic scalability, Traffic Manager, and redundancy, administrators can ensure that their applications are always available and performant. Doing so helps ensure that customers receive a consistent experience and that applications remain reliable, secure, and cost-effective.

How do you go about managing customer accounts and billing systems in Azure?

Managing customer accounts and billing systems in Azure can be accomplished using a combination of the Azure Portal, PowerShell and various APIs. The Azure Portal provides a UI where customers can manage their accounts, and where an admin can view usage, set quotas and configure billing options. PowerShell provides a scripting language for automating tasks such as setting quotas, creating accounts and managing billing systems. Finally, Azure APIs can be used for programmatically accessing data related to customer accounts, billing, and analytics. In order to manage customer accounts, start by setting up user accounts and configuring settings such as quota, authentication and billing. For example, to authenticate a user you would use the Azure Active Directory Graph API. To query customer accounts, you can use the Azure Billing REST API. Using PowerShell, you could run scripts to routinely check for changes in customer accounts, such as sudden increases in usage, etc. To create reports on various aspects of customer accounts, such as usage, billing and analytics, you can use the Azure Analytics API.
To sum it up, managing customer accounts and billing systems in Azure requires a combination of the Azure Portal, PowerShell and various APIs. The portal is used to manage accounts and configure options, PowerShell is used to automate tasks, and various APIs are used to access data related to customer accounts, billing and analytics.

What strategies do you use to keep up with changes in the Azure platform?

Keeping up with changes in the Azure platform requires staying up to date with Microsoft's roadmap and announcements, as well as monitoring Azure developments in the community. In terms of the roadmap, you can use the Azure Updates page to check out new features and enhancements that are coming soon, or have already been announced for the platform. You can also subscribe to the Azure release blog, where Microsoft publishes details about new service releases. Additionally, there are several Azure-focused websites and message boards that offer valuable insights on what's new in the platform.
In terms of coding and automation, PowerShell is a great tool for automating tasks related to Azure. You can use PowerShell cmdlets like Get-AzureRmResourceGroup to retrieve the list of resource groups in your subscription, or use New-AzureRmResourceGroup to create a new one. You can also use the Azure SDKs to access APIs related to the Azure platform.
To sum it up, staying up to date with changes in the Azure platform requires being aware of Microsoft's roadmap and announcements, as well as monitoring Azure developments in the community. Additionally, PowerShell and the Azure SDKs enable you to automate tasks and access APIs related to the platform.


How do you ensure high quality standards in Azure deployments?

Ensuring high quality standards in Azure deployments requires using a combination of best practices, testing and automation. When it comes to best practices, it is important to follow the design patterns laid out in the official Azure documentation. Additionally, it is important to research any upcoming changes that may impact your deployment. As for testing, you should test each component of your deployment separately before integrating them into the larger system. This allows you to ensure that everything is working as expected. Finally, automation can help you reduce the amount of manual work needed to deploy and maintain your application.
PowerShell is a great tool for automating tasks related to Azure. You can use PowerShell cmdlets like Set-AzureRmResourceGroup for setting up and configuring resource groups, or use New-AzureRmWebApp to create App Services. The Azure CLI can also be used to automate tasks such as deploying resources, managing Azure services and creating custom scripts. Additionally, you can use the Azure SDKs to access APIs related to the Azure platform.
To sum it up, ensuring high quality standards in Azure deployments requires following the official design patterns, testing each component of the system, and using automation tools such as PowerShell and the Azure SDKs. Automation enables you to reduce the amount of manual work needed to deploy and maintain your application.